Buying Polynesian
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Dedicated to the preservation and promotion of Polynesian Art and Culture

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Buying Polynesian

A Critical Look at Modern Maori Carving

A Critical Look at Modern Maori Carving

Some care is required on this subject because it is not my aim to be critical of specific artists, but it is necessary to use pertinent examples in discussing the merits or otherwise of modern Maori carving. As we shall see my argument is not against modern Maori carvers but the whole issue of Maori carving being an ongoing perpetuation of 19th century steel carving which was the style that developed forty of fifty years after Cook first arrived on these shores in 1769 and introduced iron in the form of the spike nail.

Hawaiian Fish Hooks – How to tell Authentic from Tourist Trash

Hawaiian Fish Hooks – How to tell Authentic from Tourist Trash

This fish hook pendant made from Mammoth ivory sells for $650 US probably representing the high end of modern Hawaiian fish hooks and it is of course not Hawaiian, except that it is made supposedly in Hawaii which is not at all the same thing.  Below is an image of an old Hawaiian fish hook from the Bishop Museum Collection (Princess Ruth Keelikolani Collection) accession number B.03650 made from human bone and it is typical Hawaiian form with an incurved point and lower barb, the original Hawaiian olona line still attached to the top of the shank.

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